Monday, June 27, 2011

Review : A Novel Bookstore

A Novel Bookstore by Laurence Cosse (translated by Alison Anderson). Europa Editions, 2010.

[Source: Won]

A Novel Bookstore sounded like the perfect book for me. A budding bookstore and its selectors find themselves the victims of violent crimes of intimidation. Perfect, right? It combines my love of mysteries with my love of all things book-related. Unfortunately, the book about the ideal bookstore was not my ideal. While I enjoyed the notion of creating a bookstore that only sells great novels, the crime angle left something to be desired. A Novel Bookstore began to feel like a diatribe against modern publishing and publicity practices. Again, I agree to an extent, but I felt the book was somehow misrepresented in the description I read. The crimes themselves play a very minor role in the story. There real purpose seem to be to give the bookstore proprietors a reason to reveal all the secrets of the bookstore to a sympathetic detective and therefore the reader.

The narrator, however, is not one of the proprietors, but a disembodied voice whose identity was uncertain through much of the book. Not typically a problem for me, but the general tedium of the book resulted in me obsessing over the narrator. Maybe I’m judging A Novel Bookstore harshly because I read most of it on vacation. Maybe it’s not a vacation book or a tired traveler book. Maybe it's the translation. I’m not sure. All I know is, I did not particularly enjoy this book.

If you’ve been thinking of reading this book on account of the crime angle, don’t bother. If you’ve been thinking of reading this book because of the philosophy and ideas it presents, give it a whirl. I’d love to hear what you think.

Amazon Associate link:
A Novel Bookstore

Saturday, June 25, 2011

Weekly wrap-up: twenty-nine

The weekly wrap-up is my way of keeping my loyal readers informed of my bookish activities and holding myself to my bookish obligations. The questions may change slightly depending on the week.

Q: What are you reading right now?
A: Before I Go to Sleep by S.J. Watson


Q: Why are you reading it? Business? Pleasure? For review?
A: I received a copy for review.

Q: What have you read since the last weekly update?
A: Fun and Games by Duane Swierczynski and The End of Everything by Megan Abbott


Q: What do you plan to read next?
A: Billingsgate Shoal by Rick Boyer

Q: Why do you want to read it?
A: It's my next read for the Edgar Awards Reading Challenge.

Q: What books did you acquire?
A: From Publisher: Dominance by Will Lavender
Won: Endless Night by Agatha Christie

Wednesday, June 22, 2011

Review : The Ridge

The Ridge by Michael Koryta. Little, Brown, 2011.

[Source: Purchased]

There are so many many seemingly disparate elements in The Ridge that it could easily turn into a disjointed train wreck of a novel. Michael Koryta is much better than that though. He manages to weave together exotic cats, a mysterious lighthouse, and the failure of a small town newspaper into a compelling ghost story with ease.

Deputy sheriff Kevin Kimble and newspaper man Roy Darmus are both contacted by Wyatt French, the town drunk and keeper of a lighthouse in the middle of the woods. French seems to ramble crazily and speaks of death and suicide to both men. Darmus is so unsettled by his conversation with French that he drives out to the lighthouse to check on him. There he finds French’s body and the beginnings of a strange and mysterious story.

He and Kimble work together to put together the pieces gathered by French. At the same time, an exotic cat rescue facility opens across from the lighthouse. The cats are uncomfortable in their new environment, and Kimble is soon dealing with problems on that front too. The truth of Blade Ridge and the happenings at the rescue center are parallel tracks that soon come crashing together in an amazing finish.

When I read The Cypress House, I was sure it was going to be my favorite of Koryta’s three supernatural tales. However, The Ridge somehow grabbed me even more than The Cypress House. Koryta continues to best himself with each novel he turns out and has definitely put himself on my list of must-read authors. I can’t wait to see what he comes up with next.

Related posts:
Review : So Cold the River
Bookish event : Michael Koryta, author (Feb. 2011)
Bookish event : Michael Koryta, author (June 2011)
Review : The Cypress House

Amazon Associate link:
The Ridge

Tuesday, June 21, 2011

Review : The Cypress House

The Cypress House by Michael Koryta. Little, Brown, 2011.

[Source: Purchased]

The Cypress House is Michael Koryta's second novel with a supernatural bent but the only one of the three set in the past. It takes place during the Depression and focuses on a CCC worker named Arlen Wagner. Arlen has a gift. He can see death on people before it strikes.

The novel opens with Arlen and junior CCC worker Paul Brickhill on a train to the Florida Keys and a CCC bridge project. Then Arlen sees death on everyone around him and knows they have to get off the train. He and Paul don't reboard at the next stop. A hitched ride eventually leads them to the Cypress House where it quickly becomes obvious they've traded one danger for another. Together with the owner of the Cypress House, Rebecca Cady, they must defeat that danger before death comes for them again.

Koryta creates a solid, believable voice for each of his Depression-era characters. He was able to make them inhabit the era without sounding forced. And talk about tension. For the last quarter of the book especially, I was pinned to the edge of my seat as everything came to a head. I had no idea who would survive or if they would succeed at all. The Cypress House was a joy to read. If you liked So Cold the River, I'm confident you will love The Cypress House. Despite my affinity for the setting of So Cold the River (I am a born and bred Hoosier after all.), The Cypress House quickly became my new favorite Koryta novel. If you haven't read it yet, go get it now!

Related posts:
Review : So Cold the River
Bookish event : Michael Koryta, author (Feb. 2011)
Bookish event : Michael Koryta, author (June 2011)

Amazon Associate link:
The Cypress House
So Cold the River

Monday, June 20, 2011

Bookish event : Michael Koryta, author


Yes, this is the same picture from the last time I saw Michael Koryta, but I swear I just saw him again. Plus, he really hasn't changed since February. Anyway, Koryta put in an appearance at Big Hat Books on Tuesday, June 7, to promote his newest novel, The Ridge. Michael and Liz (owner of Big Hat Books) once again recruited local children’s author and all-around great guy Jeff Stone to serve as the facilitator of the event. Koryta didn’t read from The Ridge but instead engaged in conversation with Stone and the audience.

The evening began as usual with introductions by Liz. She shared some good news about Koryta’s work that I’m sure you’ve heard by now. The Ridge was featured as a top summer read in the New York Times Sunday Book Review. This on the heels of news that Chris Columbus has acquired the rights to The Cypress House and will write the script and produce the film.

The majority of the evening's conversation focused on The Ridge. The new novel is set in Kentucky, but is based on a location in Indiana, the Exotic Feline Rescue Center in Center Point. Koryta talked about his visits to the Center and the wonderful work led by Joe Taft. Joe was a huge help to Koryta in writing the The Ridge.

The original spark for The Ridge, however, came from the lighthouse on the cover. He had a sudden image in his head of a lighthouse in the woods with no water around it. He couldn’t shake the idea of writing an answer to the question of why someone would build such a lighthouse. Luckily for Koryta and his readers, his editor saw the passion he had for what would become The Ridge from a few early pages about a lighthouse and cats.

Unlike his earlier works, Koryta began The Ridge with a setting and an atmosphere, but without much idea about the plot or characters. This lack of clarity led him to write 2,500 pages to get to the 353 published pages. The protagonist was originally Roy Darmus with Kevin Kimble as a D character. Through the course of his writing, Koryta found that Kimble was the real protagonist and Roy became a C character.

Koryta wanted to inject his perspective on the closing of small town newspapers thus the inclusion of Roy Darmus at all. There are small papers all around the country that have done amazing work, but that have fallen victim to large companies with an eye on profits alone and the rise of the internet. It raises the question which Koryta asks in The Ridge, “What happens when you remove the watchdog?” For more on this particular angle, check out Koryta's post on the Mulholland Books website.

One audience member asked where Koryta gets the otherworldliness element of his writing. He talked about how he has always been fascinated by the past. He considers himself a bit of a history geek and likes to think about how history ripples forward to affect the present. As a result of his interests, his work has become a blend of factual and supernatural. Koryta believes he writes from a gothic slant.

In response to other audience questions, Koryta said The Ridge and Sorrow’s Anthem, the second in his Lincoln Perry series, are the books of which he is proudest as well as his most personal. I haven't read any of Koryta's Lincoln Perry books, but based on his current work and the comments on the series from other audience members, I think I should.

After the questions wrapped up, Koryta signed books including my new, shiny hardcover copy.

Related posts:
Review : So Cold the River
Bookish event : Michael Koryta, author (Feb 2011)

Amazon Associate link:
The Ridge

Friday, June 17, 2011

Weekly wrap-up : number twenty-eight

The weekly wrap-up is my way of keeping my loyal readers informed of my bookish activities and holding myself to my bookish obligations. The questions may change slightly depending on the week.

Last week's focus on the blog was Mulholland Books. This week it was the Edgar Awards Reading Challenge as I finally got reviews of my last two reads posted and did a monthly update post. You'll see from my current and upcoming reading that the focus has shifted back to Mulholland Books and its two newest publications. You may see a review of The Wreckage next week, but the main focus will be on Michael Koryta. Watch for a recap of a recent signing I attended as well as reviews of The Cypress House and The Ridge. But for now, on with the weekly wrap-up questions!

Q: What are you reading right now?
A: The Wreckage by Michael Robotham. Mullholland Books, 2011.


Q: Why are you reading it? Business? Pleasure? For review?
A: I received a copy for review.

Q: What was the last thing you read?
A: The White Devil by Justin Evans. Harper, 2011.


Q: What do you plan to read next?
A: Fun and Games by Duane Swierczynski. Mulholland Books, 2011.


Q: Why do you want to read it?
A: I received a copy for review.

Q: What books did you acquire?
A: Earlier this week, I announced a new goal for 2011 on Twitter. The number of books in my LibraryThing To Read Collection has gotten away from me. The goal is to get it under 200. When I announced this goal, my count was at 225. Doesn't seem that hard, right? The problem is continuing to acquire things. I was hoping to get through this week without adding to the total, but, alas, two books arrived on my doorstep the very same day I set my goal! I'm not delusional enough to think I won't keep acquiring. I'm just hoping to be more mindful of it. So, bringing the TBR total up to 227:

From Publisher: Triple Crossing by Sebastian Rotella, The Revisionists by Thomas Mullen


Does anyone know how to create a widget that will show the number of books in my LT To Read Collection on my blog?

Q: What bookish events did you attend?
A: After a busy week that included the Printers Row Lit Fest and a Michael Koryta signing, this was a quiet week with no events.

Thursday, June 16, 2011

Review : A Hard Death

A Hard Death by Jonathan Hayes. Harper, 2011. (Published April 12)

[Source: Publisher]

A Hard Death is the second in Jonathan Hayes’ Edward Jenner series. Having read the first, Precious Blood, is not a prerequisite for reading A Hard Death. I had no problem following the story without previous knowledge of Dr. Jenner. I will admit though, I’m curious to read the Precious Blood to learn all the details of how Jenner came to be where he is in A Hard Death.

Dr. Edward Jenner, a criminal pathologist, has left New York and found temporary work in Florida while his mentor, Doc Roburn, is away on vacation. As the bodies start piling up, Jenner is quickly drawn into a deadly game involving corrupt cops and cold-blooded drug dealers.

The main storyline involves drug trafficking, but there is a disturbing side story that plays into the main plot. I understand the need for it in order to tie everything together, but I really could have done without it. This is the second book of late that has left me slightly nauseated in the end. Not my favorite feeling. That being said, the book was good overall. I enjoyed the mystery and kept reading even when I knew I wasn’t going to like parts of it.

POTENTIAL SPOILER ALERT:
I don’t want to ruin anything, but feel I have to warn you. If you are squeamish about [highlight to reveal] child abuse, you may want to leave this one on the shelf.

Amazon Associate link:
A Hard Death

Wednesday, June 15, 2011

Reading challenge : Edgar Awards : Update five

image courtesy of Jeff Babbitt
Since my last update, I've posted reviews for my April and May Edgar reads, Whip Hand and Peregrine. I haven't gotten to my June read yet, which will be Billingsgate Shoal by Rick Boyer. I'm hoping to pick up the pace of my Edgar Awards reading as I've been taking in fewer ARCs lately. The stack was getting pretty overwhelming so I cut myself off from requesting more books.

I managed to score three of the books on my Edgar list at the store closing sale of my local Borders...a bittersweet victory, I assure you. There is still a cluster of 1980s Edgar winners that I haven't been able to find yet. I may have to resort to some online shopping in order to maintain my chronological progression through the winners list.

If you haven't been linking up your reviews, links to do so are in the right sidebar and on the Edgar Awards Reading Challenge page. Use the Mr. Linky below to share your June reviews. Please be sure to give the direct link to your post rather than the link to your blog. For those of you without blogs, feel free to post your update/review in the comments.

Tuesday, June 14, 2011

Review : Peregrine

Peregrine by William Bayer. Congdon & Lattes, 1981.

[Source: Purchased]

1982 Edgar Award Winner for Best Novel

Peregrine is the first in William Bayer’s Janek series and my fifth read for the Edgar Awards Reading Challenge. A killer peregrine falcon is loose in New York City. A TV station races to maintain their scoop while the police race to figure out how to stop it. Is it acting alone? Has someone trained it to kill? All involved soon come to the conclusion that there is a falconer behind the falcon. As the reader, you know from the beginning what the truth is and just have to wait, biting your nails, hoping they figure it out in time.

The falconer becomes obsessed with newscaster Pamela Barrett and is determined to make her his own human falcon. As the killings continue, the TV station and the police's differing priorities clash and Pamela draws closer to true danger. The only hope is that police detective Frank Janek will discover the truth despite a lack of cooperation from Pamela and her TV colleagues.

Though Janek investigates the peregrine case, he felt almost incidental next to Pamela Barrett and the falconer. I found this interesting since he is the feature character of the series. Perhaps Bayer didn’t originally intend it as a series or maybe this is just his style. Regardless, Janek did peak my interest as a character without being front and center.

Peregrine really kept me on edge. In the end, though, I was a little weirded out by it. It was kind of like watching a super creepy episode of Law & Order: Special Victims Unit. I like SVU, but there were some images in Peregrine that I wish weren’t in my head. If you’re sensitive to that sort of material, I wouldn’t recommend Peregrine despite it being a good mystery.

Related post:
Reading challenge : Edgar Awards

Amazon Associate link:
Peregrine

Monday, June 13, 2011

Review : Whip Hand

Whip Hand by Dick Francis. Berkley, 2005. (Originally published 1980)

[Source: Purchased]

1981 Edgar Award Winner for Best Novel

Whip Hand is the second installment in Francis’ Sid Halley series and my fourth read for the Edgar Awards Reading Challenge. Sid Halley is a clever guy. Once a celebrated jockey, an injury has put him on the sidelines. He remains a part of the horse racing world by becoming an investigator for friends from his former life. Despite no background as a PI, Halley has taken to it like a fish in water.

In Whip Hand, Halley is approached by the wife of a horse owner to investigate possible sabotage of her husband’s horses. A series of horses expected to win big have suddenly fallen ill and been left unable to race. She thinks it is anything but coincidence. Halley’s search for the truth quickly becomes dangerous. The final twist will leave you awed by Sid’s deductive ability.

In all honesty, I didn’t anticipate liking this book. The theme of horse racing doesn’t hold appeal for me. I was pleasantly surprised. I would definitely read the other Sid Halley books. I don’t think reading Whip Hand requires having read the first in the series, Odds Against, so if you’re intrigued, go ahead and pick it up.

Related post:
Reading challenge :  Edgar Awards

Amazon Associate link:
Whip Hand
Odds Against

Saturday, June 11, 2011

Bookish event : Printers Row Lit Fest 2011

Last Saturday I made my annual pilgrimage to the Printers Row Lit Fest in Chicago. I started the day by attending an author event with Elizabeth Stuckey-French, author of The Revenge of the Radioactive Lady, and Eleanor Brown, author of The Weird Sisters. While the moderator left something to be desired, these two amazing women made it an enjoyable event. After hearing Stuckey-French talk about Radioactive Lady, I’m definitely adding it to my TBR list.

Much of the time was spent discussing point of view. The moderator and several audience members were really interested in Brown’s choice to use the 1st person plural point of view in The Weird Sisters. Eleanor talked about how she’s always been interested in how stories are told. She asked herself why people don’t use 1st person plural. Then she did it and found out...it’s hard. However, for The Weird Sisters, she likes how it highlighted that you can’t escape your family. She told us that the “we” of The Weird Sisters is always all three of the sisters.

Stuckey-French talked about her difficulty in developing Radioactive Lady. In fact, one of her friends told her after reading a draft, I love your characters but you need a new plot. Ouch. The book really took off for her once she started writing Marylou Ahearn’s character. Previously, the story had been told from Dr. Spriggs’ point of view. Radioactive Lady is in 3rd person with different characters taking the lead from chapter to chapter. Stuckey-French said she didn’t use first person because she worried that the characters would sound too much alike.

Another interesting part of the conversation was the reaction of both authors to V.S. Naipaul’s recent comments about female authors. While completely dismissing the idea that men are better authors than women, Brown said male and female authors are treated differently. She brought up the gender disparity in reviews that was a major topic around the time Franzen’s The Corrections came out. Eleanor also pointed out that we don’t have to criticize male authors to celebrate female authors more.

Afterwards, I finally got to meet Eleanor Brown and have her sign a copy of The Weird Sisters.


After some browsing and a yummy lunch at Flaco’s Tacos, I got a book signed by Pete Hamill. Unfortunately, I couldn’t bring myself to sit in a sweltering tent for an hour to hear him speak beforehand.


Then it was time for the walk over to the Harold Washington Library Center to see Chicago-based authors Marcus Sakey and Sean Chercover. I was excited to see that copies of The Two Deaths of Daniel Hayes were on sale despite the release date being a few days away. Thanks Dutton for letting this happen! Another pleasant surprise was seeing Meredith Baxter in the lobby doing a signing.


Sakey and Chercover began with the story of their first booksigning, which took place in Kokomo, Indiana. It was a bit of a comedy of errors as they forgot the time change, lost their radio promotion, and sat trapped by a strange man obsessed by serial killers. Fun times. Marcus Sakey has come a long way from that signing with major Hollywood names optioning two of his books. Ben Affleck has the rights to The Blade Itself and Tobey Maguire the rights to Good People.

Sakey talked about how The Two Deaths of Daniel Hayes grew out of a quote by Satchel Paige, who said “How old would you be if you didn’t know how old you are?” It gave Sakey the idea of asking the question “Who would you be if you didn’t know who you are?” Chercover jumped in to say that the theme of identity runs through all of Sakey’s works.

Marcus Sakey has a different sort of project on his plate right now -- writing and hosting a new show for the Travel Channel called “Hidden Cities.” Sakey will travel to different cities to investigate the impact of crime and chronicle specific crimes. The first episode looks at Chicago and three famous events/people: the 1968 Democratic Convention riots, John Dillinger, and H.H. Holmes, the serial killer featured in Erik Larson’s The Devil in the White City. I’m looking forward to checking this show out.

Both authors will be at Bouchercon this year. If you’re going to be there too, go see them!

I had my brand new copy of The Two Deaths of Daniel Hayes signed afterwards.


That was the end of my day at the Printers Row Lit Fest. A light rain had set in by that point, and I was ready for a rest! If you're in the area, you should definitely go to next year's Lit Fest. Though the number of booksellers has decreased in recent years, they continue to have a great selection of author appearances that are worth the trip.

Friday, June 10, 2011

Upcoming titles from Mulholland Books

Thanks for joining me for Mulholland Books week here at Reader for Life! Wondering what's coming next from this new imprint? Here are a few titles to look forward to this summer.

Weekly wrap-up : number twenty-seven

The weekly wrap-up is my way of keeping my loyal readers informed of my bookish activities and holding myself to my bookish obligations. The questions may change slightly depending on the week.

Q: What are you reading right now?
A: The Ridge by Michael Koryta


Q: Why are you reading it? Business? Pleasure? For review?
A: I received a copy for review and had the opportunity to see Michael Koryta talk about it earlier this week.

Q: What was the last thing you read?
A: The Cypress House by Michael Koryta


Q: What do you plan to read next?
A: The White Devil by Justin Evans


Q: Why do you want to read it?
A: I received a copy for review.

Q: What books did you acquire?
A: Purchased: The Two Deaths of Daniel Hayes by Marcus Sakey, The Tiger's Wife by Tea Obreht, The House at Riverton and The Forgotten Garden by Kate Morton, and The Lonely Polygamist by Brady Udall
LibraryThing Early Reviewers: The Hand that Trembles by Kjell Eriksson


Q: What bookish places did you go to?
A: In the course of attending some bookish events, I visited my local indie, Big Hat Books & Arts, and the absolutely gorgeous Harold Washington Library Center of the Chicago Public Library.

Q: What bookish events did you attend?
A: Last weekend, I went to the Printers Row Lit Fest in Chicago. I also attended a reading by Michael Koryta at Big Hat Books on Tuesday. I'll be writing separate posts about both events.

Thursday, June 9, 2011

Review : A Drop of the Hard Stuff

A Drop of the Hard Stuff by Lawrence Block. Mulholland Books, 2011. (Published May 12)

[Source: Mulholland Books]

A Drop of the Hard Stuff is the seventeenth installment in Block's Matthew Scudder series. Don't let that turn you off if you've never read a Matthew Scudder book before. I'd never read any of them and had no trouble following A Drop of the Hard Stuff. This is largely due to the premise of the novel. Chronologically, it fits in with some of the earliest Matthew Scudder titles, taking the reader back to his early days as a private investigator. The book opens with the present day Scudder shooting the breeze with an old friend. As they talk, Scudder begins to tell the story of "High-Low" Jack Ellery, a childhood acquaintance who reappeared in Scudder's life just before he achieved one year of sobriety in 1982.

Ellery turns up dead, and Scudder's search for the killer threatens to destroy the new life he's trying to build. While A Drop of the Hard Stuff is a great mystery, the flashback narration also makes it a touching reflection on sobriety and the choices that make up our lives. Matthew Scudder is a flawed and endearing character that I want know better. I have another Matthew Scudder novel on TBR list for the Edgar Awards Reading Challenge, but after reading this one, I'm eager to go back to the beginning of this series and see how it all started. I encourage you to pick up A Drop of the Hard Stuff to get a taste of this legendary mystery writer and his most celebrated character, Matthew Scudder.

Related post:
Publisher spotlight : Mulholland Books
Review : Guilt by Association
Review : The Bayou Trilogy

Amazon Associate link:
A Drop of the Hard Stuff

Wednesday, June 8, 2011

Review : The Bayou Trilogy

The Bayou Trilogy by Daniel Woodrell. Mulholland Books, 2011. (Published April 28)

[Source: Mulholland Books]

The Bayou Trilogy gathers together Woodrell’s three novels featuring police detective Rene Shade, Under the Bright Lights (1986), Muscle for the Wing (1988), and The Ones You Do (1992). These titles represent three of Woodrell’s first four books and certainly make me willing to read more of his work.

Rene Shade works in the the parish of St. Bruno, a town with clearly defined lines between blacks and whites with internal lines between the law and the criminals that sometimes blur. St. Bruno is the sort of place where the police know quite well who the criminals are, but each side keeps to itself until someone dies. In Under the Bright Lights, the lines are crossed and the town threatens to boil over after the murder of a black city councilman. Shade has to work quickly to keep the peace.

Muscle for the Wing features a prison gang hitting the biggest crime bosses in town. Shade has to walk a fine line between following orders and following the law. Unfortunately for Shade, he doesn't have the same sense of compromise that the town bosses and even his own brothers have.

The Ones You Do finds Shade on suspension after the events of Muscle for the Wing and unlikely to ever be a police officer again. In the midst of his soul-searching, John X. Shade, the family patriarch, returns to St. Bruno after years of roaming. He’s on the run from another shady character (please excuse the pun) who thinks John X. stole his money. For once, John X. is completely innocent and is just trying to protect the wife who’s just left him and the daughter he’s left to care for. This was my least favorite of the three, but that's mainly due to my desire for happy endings...though happy endings are in the eye of the beholder.

The three novels taken together create an interesting vignette of one man and his town. In fact, it’s hard for me to imagine reading them individually and separated by time. They flow together perfectly to create a single work. I’d especially recommend The Bayou Trilogy to those of you who enjoy the setting of the South, which is exceptionally well done by Mr. Woodrell.

Related post:
Publisher spotlight : Mulholland Books
Review : Guilt by Association
Review : A Drop of the Hard Stuff

Amazon Associate link:
The Bayou Trilogy

Tuesday, June 7, 2011

Review : Guilt by Association

Guilt by Association by Marcia Clark. Mulholland Books, 2011. (Published April 20)

[Source: Mulholland Books]

Guilt by Association is Marcia Clark’s first novel. Yes, that Marcia Clark. O.J. Simpson trial Marcia Clark. I was a bit leery of this book because of that, but my reservations were completely unfounded. Clark writes what she knows. Her main character is Los Angeles District Attorney Rachel Knight, a tough, no-nonsense, crime-fighter that I’m sure you’ll love.

Knight’s life is turned upside-down when her equally workaholic co-worker is found dead in a seedy motel. Rachel is determined to find out what happened to Jake and save his reputation despite the risks to her own career and life. She is aided on her quest by two equally kick ass women, fellow prosecutor Toni and police detective Bailey. Rachel and Bailey really take the lead in solving Jake’s murder and endure some scary moments along the way...not least of which are moments of doubting Jake’s innocence.

I can easily see Rachel Knight and her cohorts becoming series characters for Clark. While I don’t know if this is the plan, I’d recommend getting in on the ground floor just in case. Pick up Guilt by Association for a fun and believable crime novel with strong, smart and likeable female characters.

Related post:
Publisher spotlight : Mulholland Books
Review : The Bayou Trilogy
Review : A Drop of the Hard Stuff

Amazon Associate link:
Guilt by Association